Technique: POV – Point of view

The human eye. Many photographs can have relatively uninteresting touch, and that’s probably because they have almost all been taken from the same point of view, that of from approximately 1.50 m off ground level, the height of the average standing human eye. But to get up higher, or lower, can create a far more interesting and dramatic composition of a usually very familiar subject. For example, there’s a huge difference of impact between that of a picture of a dog from above, as we usually see them, and that of a picture taken from a dog’s point of view of another dog, whereby the camera almost becomes the subject… Read More

Continue Reading

Technique: Architecture

Machines for living in. Architecture defines our environment, it’s to us what a collection of simple cave dwellings was to Neolithic man. But we’ve gone a long way since then, transforming our living space with more than just a series of purely functional objects, design plays an extremely important role. Architectural photography can therefore be both rewarding and challenging, not least because of the many different factors in play, some controllable, others not. But it’s not the case that architecture equals just buildings, almost everything constructed falls within the theme: buildings, bridges, monuments, street furniture etc. It’s not even just about the the exteriors, there are the interiors to consider… Read More

Continue Reading

Technique: Colour

An experience. Colours don’t actually exist, they are purely the way we experience the different wavelengths of light which enter our eyes hitting an array of photoreceptors on the retina, our brains then interpret the resulting stimuli, producing an experience we call “colour”. We see colour therefore everywhere, but because it is so ubiquitous we usually just take it for granted, paying it little attention, but it actually has a huge effect on our emotions and psychological state. We find blues soothing, yellows stimulating, greens balanced and harmonious, where as reds are aggressive and have even more visual impact due to their short wavelength, making them appear nearer than they… Read More

Continue Reading

Technique: Working the subject

Vary the shot. It’s easy to walk around with a digital camera just “machine gunning” away, taking as many photos as possible, in the hope that at least some of them will be ok, the so-called “spray and pray” technique. But there’s also another option, and that’s still to take as many shots as possible, but this time with more purpose, to find a subject and explore it, find its potential, taking shots of it from different angles, at varying distances, in various styles and compositions, it’s called “working the subject”. So when on location, with each subject you pick to photograph, try to take varying shots of it, and… Read More

Continue Reading

Technique: Urban art

Society’s texture. Urban photography is a great way of collecting some really gritty images, and it’s also a good opportunity to document and preserve a form of street art, that by its very nature is temporary, ever changing, a chameleon like film of paint on the edge of society, both reflecting and projecting the present. Urban or street art can be both witty and profound, from the simplest of tags to the most intricate  of murals, its purpose is always the same: to be noticed. And where better to capture some than at . . . . . . the RAW Gelände Welcome to the Thunderdome. Definition – Thunderdome: Turbulent,… Read More

Continue Reading

Technique: Street photography

The moment is fleeting. “Photography is not like painting. There is a creative fraction of a second when you are taking a picture. Your eye must see a composition or an expression that life itself offers you, and you must know with intuition when to click the camera. That is the moment the photographer is creative. Oop! The Moment! Once you miss it, it is gone forever.” Henri Cartier-Bresson What exactly is street photography? Also sometimes referred to as “candid photography”, it often records chance encounters and random incidents in public places in a human environment. The term “street photography” is actually very broad, and for this reason it doesn’t… Read More

Continue Reading

Technique: Black and white

Colourless. Monochrome photography is where the image contains only one hue rather than all the colours of the rainbow, this can be in tones of grey as in classic black and white photography, but sepia and cyan can also be used to great effect. Monochrom photography is very often used for artistic reasons, and as colours and their interplay are no longer present to distract, key elements such as lighting and composition take on a new priority. But what is it about black and white photography that despite the world being ablaze with colour and the possibilities to capture it becoming ever more sophisticated, that we still find black and… Read More

Continue Reading

Technique: ICM – Intensional camera movement

The static light and the moving camera. When an artist applies paint with a brush, he does so in order to control the colours reflected from the canvas, but he rarely tries to achieve realism, not every image has to be crisp and well defined, often it’s the very imperfections, the added texture, the implied movement that convey the most meaning, which is why whole art movements revolve around the abstract, where impression and expression are far more important than the perfect reproduction of a situation and/or scene. And just because the camera is quite capable of producing an almost hyper-realism, that doesn’t mean that it always has to, with… Read More

Continue Reading